Tag Archives: Weezer

1994 Nostalgic Songs: Longview

Like Weezer, Green Day was big in 1994 and they’re still around.  While Weezer never made a single as good as “Undone” again, Green Day grew up ten years later and took on the state of the nation with American Idiot.  But their singles from Dookie, are still damn good pop-punk singles – ones that an entire generations of  bands have been trying to copy for years without succeeding.

For me, “Longview” is the best of these songs from Dookie-era Green Day.  Like “Undone”, “Longview” plays with the standard soft verse/loud chorus: the verses have no guitar, just drums and the now famous bass line.  “Longview” is perhaps  rock greatest ode to boredom – a feeling many teenagers could easily relate to.  Billie Joe (who would later turn into the greatest frontman of his generation) sounds convincing in his boredom.  He turns on the TV, “but nothing’s on”, yet still watches it for “an hour or two.”  So what’s he to do to cure his boredom?  Masturbate, of course.  As his sexual urges take over, the song literally takes off and explodes.  The song hasn’t been totally quiet until this point, but the production here is great – the band literally rushes out of the speakers as Billie Joe is taken “away to paradise”.

Lack of motivation never sounded as glorious as it does in the bridge.  Where has all the motivation gone? “Smoking my inspiration!” He declares.  Notice that he doesn’t suggest that he’s smoking his inspiration away. This lack of inspiration and motivation doesn’t seem to bother him.  In fact he’s going to let you know that he doesn’t give a shit what you think – “Call me pathetic call me what you will”.

“Longview” was one of the first songs I remember hearing on the radio where not just one, but several words were edited out.  At the age of 12 or 13 that made it more appealing.  As a teenager, you’re often bored and you’re don’t know why.  Other acts at the time may have viewed boredom as a sign of depression and loneliness.  “Longview” is a funny, yet true view of being bored when you have no idea what to do.  It doesn’t pretend to be about anything less or more.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Nostalgic 1994 Songs: “Undone (The Sweater Song)”

Even if Weezer had faded away after putting out Pinkerton (which has since become something of a classic) their singles from The Blue Album would still be considered classics.  No other band in the 90’s combined pop hooks with loud guitars as well as Weezer.  Nirvana made taken their cues from punk and The Pixies, while Weezer used Cheap Trick as a influence, updating the pop sensibility for a rock radio format.  No other song from The Blue Album would endure as much as “Undone (The Sweater Song)”.  Everyone knows the chorus, and will joyously/drunkenly sing along whenever it is played.  Even the chorus of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” never achieved that, as famous as it is.

Even before the chorus, the opening guitar riff is hypnotic.  It’s the same note played over and over again for a minute.  The dream-like riff is pulls you in – you’re forced to listen to the song.  Even the conversation that takes place in the background of the song seems adrift compared to the guitars.  It takes over the conversation and perhaps that was Weezer’s intent – to force the listener to take in the song.  It feels like it could go on forever, reminding me much of The Beatle’s repeated riff at the end of “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)”.  Weezer does it at the beginning of the song, but the effect is no less enthralling.

And this even before Rivers Cuomo starts singing.  The listener is already hooked, does it really matter what he sings about at this point? In most slow verse/loud chorus songs of this era, the singer would scream through the chorus as a form of catharsis. Undone does explode in the chorus with Cuomo suggesting, “if you want to destroy my sweater, pull this thread as I walk away.”  It’s so ridiculous, yet brilliant.  Everyone who heard that chorus the first time surely must have thought: “What the hell did he just say?”

The second chorus takes it even further.  “Watch me unravel, I’ll soon be naked.  Lying on the floor.”  And just as Cuomo finishes that line, the rest of the band chimes in and repeats it for extra effect.  “I’ve come undone!” Cuomo announces.  The band then takes lift-off, into a guitar-solo that never seems forced.  After the final chorus, the band itself seems to come undone – thrashing away for almost a minute.  But even among all the noise, Cuomo fires series of “ooo-ooo-ooooohs” that recall the signature riff at the beginning of the song,retaining the song’s pop elements.

“Undone” contains many stock elements of 1990’s grunge/post grunge songs.  Even by that time, the soft verse/loud chorus seemed to be dying a slow death.  But “Undone” is so different in its approach, that it seems unique among that style.  It’s little wonder that teenage kids who would later create their own bands listening to Weezer would see them as influence, and in turn take their rock-pop format foundation creating their own sub-genre of rock called Emo.

For me, Weezer was one of the first “new” bands that I grew attached to in the mid-90s.  I never had my own copy of The Blue Album, but instead had a dubbed copy of it on a cassette that I used to play all the time.  By the time “Pinkerton” came out in 1996, I had moved on to other artists.  That Christmas, I remember my brother Pete telling me I should buy “Pinkerton”, and for whatever reason I didn’t.  (I could have been ahead of the curve!)

I still enjoy many of Weezer’s songs on the radio, but like almost everybody else (and perhaps the band themselves as they are now playing The Blue Album in its entirety) I think they’ve never bettered The Blue Album, and more specifically “Undone”.

“Undone (The Sweater Song)”:

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

This Week’s Theme: Nostalgic Songs of 1994

 

(Note: This post should have come before “Everything Zen” – I thought I had published it and it wasn’t until I put up the post on “Everything Zen” that I realized my mistake.)

1994 is the first year where I really remember listening to the radio, and picking up on current musical trends.  I was 12 going on 13, discovering myself through the radio.  Kurt Cobain may have just killed himself that summer, but that fall the sounds of Weezer, Bush, Green Day, and Live were finding their way to my ears.

Previously I had relied on my siblings musical tastes.  Whatever they listened to, was what I listened to and thought was good.  While I certainly prided myself on my preferences in school, I found out that no one in classes was talking about U2.  “Basket Case” was the rage, and kids sang all the words to Beck’s “Loser” on field-trips.  Coming back from a school musical, the  radio constantly played Beastie Boy’s “Sabotoge” – a song that seemed to come from outer-space on a mission to blow up the speakers and my mind.

Everything on the radio was loud and exciting.  Masturbation was sung frankly in Green Day’s “Longview”, Gavin Rossdale reflected upon his “asshole brother” in Los Angeles.  I was too young to get the joke about “Happy Days” in the video for Weezer’s “Buddy Holly”, but I laughed hysterically about Rivers Cuomo inviting someone to destroy his sweater in “Undone (The Sweater Song)”.  Even R.E.M. (my favorite band at the time) cranked up the amps with “What’s The Frequency, Kenneth?”, declaring “don’t fuck with me” at the end of the song.

Looking back, 1994 really was a good year in music.  It was the era in between grunge and the new-wave ska revival (which was a very strange time in music, I think.)

Even though a lot of these songs aren’t on the same caliber as a lot of other stuff I listen to now, I still enjoy them and they take me back to my 12-13 year old self.  And that’s what this week’s theme is all about.

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized